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Chapter 54c: Why Let One Bad Apple…

1

December 19, 2016 by Lyn Thorne-Alder

Lirnilalie did not seem the least bit upset by Elelakorra’s questions.

“Well, because I’ve been tracking this one’s  ridiculous exploits since I first came to Edally Academy.  One of my associates had to deal with a problem with one of her children, and while we were in the area, we became aware that a couple of the students were involved in some small controversy.  Now, you normally wouldn’t assume anything malicious about a royal child, but this one has already proven that she has no interest in the sanctity of the royal name.  She has shamed and physically fought with several of her royal cousins, and was nothing short of rude to the Associate Governor Ilonilarrona.”

Enrie raised her chin.  Everything Lirnilalie was saying was technically true, except that she had no interest in the sanctity of the royal name.  She’d fought, she’d been rude, she’d shamed her cousins.

“Cousin?”  Elelakorra turned to look at Enrie.  “What do you say to these charges?”

Enrie cleared her throat.  “I have an intense interest in the strength and sanctity of the title and responsibility we are granted as, as members,” oh, she’d been doing so well!

“As members of the royal family,” Gianci offered.

“-as members of the royal family.  Thank you.  I think it’s very important that we remember that that vowel isn’t an instant key opening all doors to us.  I think that we remember it used to mean blessed by the gods, above the considerations of normal things, and that we ought to really strive to be blessed by the gods, and not just, uh, wave our vowel around like it entitles us to anything and everything.”

“You know that not many royals today would agree with you?”

“Well, then, maybe they’re right, and if so, I’ll pay the price.  But maybe I’m right, and that’s why I’m here, after all.”  She looked down at the floor.  “I’m here because I’m trying to be right about being a royal.”

“I am not surprised.  Your parents, they work very hard, don’t they?”

“I’m certain they will be disappointed in their trouble-maker of a daughter,” Lirnilalie cut in.

“No,” Elelakorra shook her head.  “You’re thinking of your parents, Lyirnilalie.” 

She was baiting Lirnilalie; and from the elegant lift of Lirnilalie’s eyebrows, Enrie wasn’t the only one that saw it.  “Of course, you speak for my father.  I am certain you would know of his disappointment.  What’s it like, being so close to power and knowing you’ll never hold it?  What are you, thirty-seventh in line to the throne?”

“Forty-eighth. But it’s not as if I’m the only one here who knows what it’s like to be near power we can’t have, am I?  How close to the throne are you?” 

“It’s not a power I ever wanted.  I’m sure you remember that, Elora.  I repudiated my vowel, and, if she had any common sense, this ridiculous little liar here would do the same, before she realizes what a rotten pile of last year’s parsnips the whole royal family is.”

“When you have a pile of rotten food,” Enrie countered, “You get rid of the rotten pieces, not the whole pile.”


1 comment »

  1. Rix Scaedu says:

    I feel that there’s a lot about why she and the Associate Governor were at Edally that she’s glossing over here. For instance, if they only went there about the daughter who was expelled, then why was Lyirnilalie along in the first place?

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